Posts Tagged ‘mark rypien’

Rex Grossman, A Historical Perspective

October 5, 2011

Through four games in the 2011 season and eight games (seven starts) as a Redskin, there have been highlights (1,873 yards, 13 TD, 4 wins) and lowlights (9 INT, 17 sacks, 6 fumbles) for quarterback Rex Grossman.

A comparison to the starting quarterbacks during each of last 11 Redskin playoff appearances reveals the Good Rex may actually be pretty good, and the Bad Rex may not be all that bad.  Perhaps better put, the good may be good enough to win with, and the bad may not be too bad to overcome.  Four games is a little early, but nonetheless…

Grossman has thrown for 247 passing yards per game this season, more than all but two of the recent playoff seasons.  He has thrown 1.5 TD per game this year, better than or on par with seven of the past 11 playoff seasons.  In seven starts in DC, Grossman has thrown  13 TD, good for 1.9 per start – outpacing even the 14-2 offensive juggernauts of 1983 (1.8) and 1991 (1.8).

This year Grossman has already thrown five INT, and in his tenure as a Redskin has completed 3.3% of his attempts to the opposing team.  Clearly this is a poor result; the league average was 2.9% in 2010 and is 2.6% through 4 weeks in 2011.  However, it is better than five prior Redskin playoff seasons, including two that ended in Super Bowl wins – 1982 (3.6%) and 1987 (3.5%).  Grossman’s mark of 3.3% is also lower than those posted by Mark Rypien (3.4%), Jay Schroeder (3.6%), and Joe Theismann (3.8%) during their careers in Washington.

Grossman has six fumbles in his eight games as a Redskins, an astronomical mark he has reduced to two in four this year (0.5 per game).  While still high, it’s worth noting that in six of the previous 11 Redskin playoff seasons there were at least 0.5 quarterback fumbles per game.

A better measure of fumbling rate may be a comparison of fumbles to combined passing & rushing attempts.  In this metric, Grossman’s result as a Redskin is 2.1%.  He’s lowered that to 1.3% this year – a mark bettered in just three of the recent playoff seasons, and lower than the Redskins career numbers for Doug Williams (1.4%), Schroeder (1.7%), Brad Johnson (1.8%), Rypien (1.8%), Jason Campbell (1.9%), and Mark Brunell (2.1%).  Not to mention Patrick Ramsey (2.8%) and Todd Collins (4.4%). 

Starting

Quarterback(s)

Regular

Season

Yards/

Game

TD/

Game

Int/

Att

Fumble/

Game

Fumble/

Pass+Rush

Campbell/Collins 2007

(9-7)

224

1.1

2.1%

1.1

3.0%

Ramsey/Brunell 2005

(10-6)

208

1.5

2.3%

0.8

2.5%

Johnson 1999

(10-6)

250

1.5

2.5%

0.8

2.2%

Rypien 1992

 

(9-7)

205

0.8

3.5%

0.3

0.8%

Rypien 1991

(14-2)

223

1.8

2.6%

0.6

2.1%

Rypien/Humphries/

Rutledge

1990

(10-6)

221

1.3

4.2%

0.2

0.5%

Williams/

Schroeder/Rubbert

1987

(11-4)

238

1.8

3.5%

0.6

1.8%

Schroeder 1986

(12-4)

257

1.4

4.1%

0.6

1.6%

Theismann 1984

(11-5)

212

1.5

2.7%

0.4

1.3%

Theismann 1983

(14-2)

232

1.8

2.4%

0.1

0.2%

Theismann 1982

(8-1)

226

1.4

3.6%

0.4

1.4%

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It’s the O-Line, Stupid

October 15, 2009

Through Sunday, the Redskins have allowed 14 sacks, good for 25th fewest in the NFL.  This comes after finishing 22nd last year while allowing 38 sacks.  A far cry from the days of the Hogs in the 1980s and even 1991, when QB Mark Rypien was only sacked seven times (the team allowed nine sacks during the regular season) en route to a Lomardi Trophy.  Consider that line:

-LT Jim Lachey: 3 Pro Bowls

-LG Raleigh McKenzie: 70 Greatest Redskins

-C Jeff Bostic: 70 Greatest Redskins

-RG Mark Schlereth: 2 Pro Bowls

-RT Joe Jacoby: 70 Greatest Redskins, NFL 1980s All-Decade Team, 4 Pro Bowls

-Reserve Russ Grimm: 70 Greatest Redskins, NFL 1980s All- Decade Team, 4 Pro Bowls

-Reserve Ray Brown: 1 Pro Bowl

-Reserve Ed Simmons: 70 Greatest Redskins

Because of these men and other Hogs among the 70 Greatest Redskins like Mark May & George Starke, the importance of talent along the offensive line is understood among the Washington faithful and those who cover the team.  Understood within the front office?  Perhaps not.  In January the WP Jasons documented that while ‘the team up the road in Baltimore’ has “invested six picks (all in the fifth round or higher, including Gaither) on offensive linemen between 2005 and 2007” who all went on to start games, the Redskins picked zero during that span.  In fact, the Dan/Vin braintrust has sleected just one O-linemen since 2004 (G Chad Rinehart in 2008) and just two in the top four rounds (Rinehart & G Derrick Dockery in 2003) since taking over

After standing out as the team’s the biggest concern over the second half of 2008, fans & media clamored for improvements, upgrades, or simply additioanl experiecned warm bodies for this year’s O-line all offseason.  The result…

-LT: 6-time Pro Bowl selection Chris Samuels (32 years old) played seemingly well before going down with an injury last week; replaced by D’Anthony Batiste (27, 4 carer starts); undrafted Stephone Heyer (25, 17 starts) will start going forward

-LG: Pete Kendall (36) is out of the league; Dockery (29) is back & overpaid after two years in Buffalo and appears to be playing well

-C: Casey Rabach (32) remains steady, although slightly overpaid

-RG: Randy Thomas (33) went down in Week 2; replaced by Will Montgomery (27, 6 previous starts), Reinhart (24, 0 previous snaps), and Mike Williams (29, three years out of the league)

-RT: 33-year-old former Pro Bowler John Jansen is in Detroit; Heyer played marginally through the first five games; Williams will start here going forward

The story is clear and the strugles of this unit have been well-documented, but stats paint an even clear picture:

-Since 2001, Washington has finished higher than 15th in fewest sacks allowed just three times – in consecutive seasons during Gibbs II from 2005-2007.  In two of those seasons the team had a winning record and made the playoffs.

-From 1982-present, the franchise has finished above 15th in this stat 17 times.  In 13 of those 17 seasons (76%) the end result was a winning record, including 10 playoff appearances and two Super Bowl, three NFC, and five NFC East championships.

-Only twice since 1982 has Washington finished with a winning record when not in the top 14 in fewest sacks allowed.

(click to enlarge)