Posts Tagged ‘rex grossman’

Rex Grossman, A Historical Perspective

October 5, 2011

Through four games in the 2011 season and eight games (seven starts) as a Redskin, there have been highlights (1,873 yards, 13 TD, 4 wins) and lowlights (9 INT, 17 sacks, 6 fumbles) for quarterback Rex Grossman.

A comparison to the starting quarterbacks during each of last 11 Redskin playoff appearances reveals the Good Rex may actually be pretty good, and the Bad Rex may not be all that bad.  Perhaps better put, the good may be good enough to win with, and the bad may not be too bad to overcome.  Four games is a little early, but nonetheless…

Grossman has thrown for 247 passing yards per game this season, more than all but two of the recent playoff seasons.  He has thrown 1.5 TD per game this year, better than or on par with seven of the past 11 playoff seasons.  In seven starts in DC, Grossman has thrown  13 TD, good for 1.9 per start – outpacing even the 14-2 offensive juggernauts of 1983 (1.8) and 1991 (1.8).

This year Grossman has already thrown five INT, and in his tenure as a Redskin has completed 3.3% of his attempts to the opposing team.  Clearly this is a poor result; the league average was 2.9% in 2010 and is 2.6% through 4 weeks in 2011.  However, it is better than five prior Redskin playoff seasons, including two that ended in Super Bowl wins – 1982 (3.6%) and 1987 (3.5%).  Grossman’s mark of 3.3% is also lower than those posted by Mark Rypien (3.4%), Jay Schroeder (3.6%), and Joe Theismann (3.8%) during their careers in Washington.

Grossman has six fumbles in his eight games as a Redskins, an astronomical mark he has reduced to two in four this year (0.5 per game).  While still high, it’s worth noting that in six of the previous 11 Redskin playoff seasons there were at least 0.5 quarterback fumbles per game.

A better measure of fumbling rate may be a comparison of fumbles to combined passing & rushing attempts.  In this metric, Grossman’s result as a Redskin is 2.1%.  He’s lowered that to 1.3% this year – a mark bettered in just three of the recent playoff seasons, and lower than the Redskins career numbers for Doug Williams (1.4%), Schroeder (1.7%), Brad Johnson (1.8%), Rypien (1.8%), Jason Campbell (1.9%), and Mark Brunell (2.1%).  Not to mention Patrick Ramsey (2.8%) and Todd Collins (4.4%). 

Starting

Quarterback(s)

Regular

Season

Yards/

Game

TD/

Game

Int/

Att

Fumble/

Game

Fumble/

Pass+Rush

Campbell/Collins 2007

(9-7)

224

1.1

2.1%

1.1

3.0%

Ramsey/Brunell 2005

(10-6)

208

1.5

2.3%

0.8

2.5%

Johnson 1999

(10-6)

250

1.5

2.5%

0.8

2.2%

Rypien 1992

 

(9-7)

205

0.8

3.5%

0.3

0.8%

Rypien 1991

(14-2)

223

1.8

2.6%

0.6

2.1%

Rypien/Humphries/

Rutledge

1990

(10-6)

221

1.3

4.2%

0.2

0.5%

Williams/

Schroeder/Rubbert

1987

(11-4)

238

1.8

3.5%

0.6

1.8%

Schroeder 1986

(12-4)

257

1.4

4.1%

0.6

1.6%

Theismann 1984

(11-5)

212

1.5

2.7%

0.4

1.3%

Theismann 1983

(14-2)

232

1.8

2.4%

0.1

0.2%

Theismann 1982

(8-1)

226

1.4

3.6%

0.4

1.4%

Well-Rested

August 26, 2010

NFL regular-season games played in 2009 for members of the current Redskins’ two-deep:

  • DL Adam Carriker*………….0
  • DL Ma’ake Kemoeatu*………0
  • OL Jammal Brown*………….0
  • WR Anthony Armstrong…..0
  • OL Kory Lichtensteiger……0
  • FB Darrel Young……………..0
  • P Josh Bidwell*……………….0
  • QB Rex Grossman……………1
  • WR Joey Galloway*………….3
  • OG Edwin Williams………….3
  • CB Kevin Barnes……………..4
  • K Graham Gano*……………..4
  • OL Chad Rinehart……………4

* currently listed as a starter

Combine All-Stars

April 21, 2010

With this week’s trade for former Rams DL Adam Carriker, the Shan-Allen-han brain trust has increased the number for former first-round draft picks on the Washington Redskins’ roster to an even more astonishing number.  Not satisfied with a roster already full of mercenaries whose career highlights came in the jerseys of their former team, the new regime also seems interested in stockpiling talent which the pride of Jarrettsville once drooled over.  Carriker is the fifth former round-1 selection acquired in this offseason alone (bolded among the list of 14 on the roster below):

  1. Donovan McNabb (1999, #2)
  2. Mike Williams (2002, #4)
  3. LaRon Landry (2007, #6)
  4. Andre Carter (2001, #7)
  5. DeAngelo Hall (2004, #8)
  6. Carlos Rogers (2005, #9)
  7. Carriker (2007, #13)
  8. Brian Orakpo (2009, #13)
  9. Albert Haynesworth (2002, #15)
  10. Santana Moss (2001, #16)
  11. Phillip Buchanon (2002, #17)
  12. Rex Grossman (2003, #22)
  13. Jason Campbell (2005, #25)
  14. Larry Johnson (2003, #27)

If there’s no last-minute Thursday night trade, the #4 pick this year will be the 15th player on the roster that was once thought of as a top-30 prospect in his class.  Also in the mix is free agent Levi Jones (2002, #10), still listed as a Redskin on nfl.com.

Perhaps more disturbing, many of this offseason’s acquisitions did nothing (absolutely or virtually) last season:

  • Carriker, Maake Kemoeatu, Josh Bidwell, Anthony Bryant, Kory Lichtensteiger, Justin Medlock, Clint Oldenburg, Ryan Torain, Lee Vickers, and Roydell Williams
  • QB Grossman had just nine pass attempts
  • RB Willie Parker rushed for just 389 yards
  • OL Artis Hicks started just three games, the lowest total since his rookie year
  • CB Phillip Buchanon had no interceptions, after totaling 7 over the prior three seasons
  • DT Howard Green had no starts playing for his fifth NFL team
  • DE Greg Peterson played in just two games
  • TE Sean Ryan played in 10 games, but caught just 14 passes
  • RB Johnson had just 581 yards, after averaging more than 1,200 over the prior four seasons